Europeenses

James ‘Jimmy’ Michael, Welsh Cycling Champion: Part 5 – Middling Jockey, Divorce, and Early Death

While 1898 was to see Jimmy continue to train as a jockey his ambition to race in silks was not to be fully realised for another year. There was still … Continue reading

October 18, 2014 · Leave a comment

James ‘Jimmy’ Michael, Welsh Cycling Champion: Part 4 – Trouble with Officialdom and the Hour at Last

By early February 1897 Jimmy had settled his affairs with the National Cycling Union (NCU) and with ‘Choppy’[1], returning to the States on the 13th via Paris where he visited … Continue reading

October 15, 2014 · 5 Comments

James ‘Jimmy’ Michael, Welsh Cycling Champion: Part 3 – American Dreams and the Race that Never Was

Jimmy’s reinstatement and return to racing did not see the end of his tribulations in 1896. In late July he failed to turn up at a meet organised by Leeds … Continue reading

October 12, 2014 · 4 Comments

James ‘Jimmy’ Michael, Welsh Cycling Champion: Part 2 – Successes and Scandals, January-July 1896

Sunday 15 December, 1895, had seen Jimmy suffer a rare defeat when he fell during the fourth lap of a 100 kilometre race at the Velodrome d’Hiver.[1] The winner, Willie … Continue reading

October 11, 2014 · Leave a comment

James ‘Jimmy’ Michael, Welsh Cycling Champion: Part 1 – Delivery Boy to World Champion, 1877-1895

Herne Hill, Saturday 30 June, 1894. Twenty-two competitors line up in the Summer heat for the Surrey Bicycle Club 100 Mile Invitation Race. Among them is a seventeen year old … Continue reading

October 9, 2014 · 2 Comments

The First Humans in Wales? Neanderthals at Pontnewydd Cave

Pontnewydd Cave in Denbighshire is the site of the oldest known human habitation in Wales and the most north-westerly hominin site of its period in Eurasia, dating back to 230,000 … Continue reading

October 8, 2014 · Leave a comment

Bikes, Dancing, Picnics and Races: Rhyl Cycling Club, 1879-1906

Picture the scene: North Wales, the seaside town of Rhyl on a sunny Whitsuntide Monday in 1885. Outside the Royal Hotel a group of cyclists from clubs in Rhyl, Oxford, … Continue reading

September 26, 2014 · 9 Comments

The Miners’ Strike in South Wales, 1984-85

“The policies of this government are clear – to destroy the coal industry and the NUM.” Arthur Scargill, President, National Union of Mineworkers “History will record that the British miner … Continue reading

September 21, 2014 · Leave a comment

Welsh Cawl

As Autumn begins in the Northern hemisphere thoughts turn to hearty winter fare. Warming soups, rib-sticking stodge, and satisfying stews. What better than a Welsh Cawl to warm your cockles … Continue reading

September 15, 2014 · Leave a comment

The Cucking Stool at Wootton Bassett

While browsing through the contents of archive.org I came across a copy of The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, Volume I, 1854, and my eye was drawn to a chapter … Continue reading

April 23, 2014 · Leave a comment

Anglo-Saxon Easter

Easter, as for all Christians, was the most important ceremony in the Anglo-Saxon liturgical year. For monastic communities abstinence and penitential repentance began on Septuagesima, the ninth Sunday before Easter … Continue reading

April 19, 2014 · Leave a comment

Devizes Pie

Devizes is a market town in Wiltshire, England, and the place of my birth. Its unusual name comes from the description of the castle that was built there by Osmund, … Continue reading

April 16, 2014 · Leave a comment

Hic:Est:Wadard

I am perhaps absurdly pleased by the fact that there is a link between the Bayeux Tapestry and my home town of Swindon in Wiltshire, England. The knight Wadard appears … Continue reading

April 12, 2014 · 1 Comment

The ætheling Æthelstan’s deathbed will of 1014

On the Friday after the feast of midsummer in 1014 Ælfgar, the son of Æffa, brought the reply of King Æthelred Unræd to his son, the ætheling Æthelstan. The ailing prince … Continue reading

April 9, 2014 · Leave a comment

The Bombing of Dresden: Morality and Air Power in World War Two

The primary object of your operations should now be focused on the morale of the enemy civil population, and in particular on the industrial workers. Air Staff Directive No. 22, … Continue reading

March 8, 2014 · 6 Comments

Kentish Huffkins

The huffkin is a flat loaf traditional to Kent with an indentation in the centre and a soft crust. This recipe is from my Mum’s first ever cookbook. Ingredients: 1lb … Continue reading

December 3, 2013 · Leave a comment