Europeenses

Revolution: A short history of Prague

“I shall now set forth our plan for all to admire. Ultimate goal: overthrow Austria. First step: take Prague. Modus operandi: seize the citadel and lookout point on the promontory … Continue reading

March 1, 2014 · Leave a comment

Gregor Mendel

Johann Mendel (1822-1884) was born in Heinzendorf, Austrian Silesia (Hynčice, Czech Republic). After studying at the University of Olmütz (Olomouc, Czech Republic) Johann joined the Augustinian order at the Altbrünn … Continue reading

February 15, 2014 · 2 Comments

Fab Five Series (Me first): A Khan, Rousseau, Orwell, a Sex Machine and The Greatest

Originally posted on Yesterday Unhinged:
Sgt. Pepper’s album cover. A work of art in and of itself. More than five people, but a good example of what I’d like from…

February 14, 2014 · 1 Comment

Robbing the Rich: Juraj Jánošík

The outlaw hero is a ubiquitous character in human history. England has Robin Hood, Australia has Ned Kelly, China has Song Jiang, Wales has Twm Siôn Cati, and Java has … Continue reading

February 12, 2014 · 3 Comments

Danube

The Danube rises in the Black Forest in the Fürstenberg Park at Donaueschingen where a plaque reminds visitors that Hier entspringt die Donau. The river in its various guises as … Continue reading

February 8, 2014 · Leave a comment

Battle of Vienna

In 1529 the citizens of Pressburg (modern day Bratislava) opened fire on an Ottoman fleet that was sailing up the Danube. Three years earlier the town had withstood a siege … Continue reading

February 1, 2014 · 2 Comments

Johannes Kepler

Between 1615 and 1621 Johannes Kepler published the seven volumes of Epitome astronomiae Copernicanae while living in Linz. In the Epitome he outlined his most famous discovery, the three laws of … Continue reading

January 29, 2014 · Leave a comment

Horse railway

In the 1830’s the Austro-Hungarian Empire boasted the world’s longest horse railway connecting Linz in Upper Austria to České Budějovice in Bohemia. Originally envisioned in 1807 by Professor Franz Joseph … Continue reading

January 25, 2014 · 4 Comments

Husité, part 2

The Hussites quickly united on a programme that in effect were the conditions for their acceptance of Sigismund. They called for the lay chalice to be authorized, for simony (the … Continue reading

January 16, 2014 · Leave a comment

Husité, part 1

On July 6, 1415, Jan Hus was led to the stake having been found guilty of charges of heresy by the Council of Constance against the doctrines of the Catholic … Continue reading

January 14, 2014 · 2 Comments

Leaping Lena

In 1954 a racing pigeon named Lena lost her sense of direction during a flight from Munich to her home in Klautzenbach and landed in Plzeň. She was found by … Continue reading

January 12, 2014 · Leave a comment

Witch Trial

“Question I. Whether witches, hags, and sorcerers really exist? I answer, they do. Even if I know that many doubt it, even Catholics and scholars, whose names are not relevant … Continue reading

January 6, 2014 · 1 Comment

Europeenses part 3

Following the Second World War Europe found itself devastated. Thirty to forty million people had perished during the conflagration, cities lay in ruins, agricultural and industrial output was dramatically reduced, … Continue reading

January 2, 2014 · 1 Comment

On the nature of things

Encyclopaedia n. a book or set of books giving information on many subjects or many aspects of one subject, typically arranged alphabetically.” Concise OED, 11th edition, 470. Derived from the Greek … Continue reading

December 29, 2013 · Leave a comment

Druckpresse

Mainz (1455), Strasbourg (1458), Cologne (1465), Rome (1467), Augsburg, Basel and  (1468), Nuremberg and Paris (1470), Cracow, Bruges, Buda, and Barcelona (1473), London and Gouda (1477), Leipzig (1481), Vienna and … Continue reading

December 23, 2013 · 2 Comments

Europeenses, part 2

The Duc de Sully’s ‘Great Design’ for an all-Christian universal republic not only excluded the Ottoman’s but also Russia, unless it converted to Catholicism, Lutheranism, or Calvinism. Less than a … Continue reading

December 21, 2013 · 1 Comment

Rhine

Der Rhein rises in two headstreams in the Swiss Alps, the Vorderrhein and the Hinterrhein, which meet at Reichenau above Chur. The river in its various guises as the Rhein, … Continue reading

December 19, 2013 · Leave a comment

Europeenses

Aachen is the disputed birthplace and favoured winter residence of Karl der Grosse (c. 747 – 814), more popularly known as Charlemagne in the English speaking world, whose kingdom at … Continue reading

December 13, 2013 · 2 Comments

Noordzee: Vikings in Frisia

The entry for the year 800 in the Annales Regni Francorum tells us that Charlemagne built a fleet on the Gallic (North) Sea which was infested with pirates. Though not … Continue reading

December 9, 2013 · 1 Comment

Doggerland

Since fisherman began beam trawling in the North Sea they have been bringing up preserved bones and artefacts from a sunken world that is now covered by water. Archaelogists have named this … Continue reading

December 4, 2013 · 2 Comments